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Excerpt from

The Valley of Fear  


- Arthur Conan Doyle


Detective fiction





The dead man lay on his back, sprawling with outstretched limbs in the centre of the room. He was clad only in a pink dressing gown, which covered his night clothes. There were carpet slippers on his bare feet. The doctor knelt beside him and held down the hand lamp which had stood on the table. One glance at the victim was enough to show the healer that his presence could be dispensed with. The man had been horribly injured. Lying across his chest was a curious weapon, a shotgun with the barrel sawed off a foot in front of the triggers. It was clear that this had been fired at close range and that he had received the whole charge in the face, blowing his head almost to pieces. The triggers had been wired together, so as to make the simultaneous discharge more destructive. The country policeman was unnerved and troubled by the tremendous responsibility which had come so suddenly upon him. "We will touch nothing until my superiors arrive," he said in a hushed voice, staring in horror at the dreadful head.


"Nothing has been touched up to now," said Cecil Barker. "I'll answer for that. You see it all exactly as I found it."


"When was that?"


The sergeant had drawn out his notebook.


"It was just half-past eleven. I had not begun to undress, and I was sitting by the fire in my bedroom when I heard the report. It was not very loud--it seemed to be muffled. I rushed down--I don't suppose it was thirty seconds before I was in the room."


"Was the door open?"


"Yes, it was open. Poor Douglas was lying as you see him. His bedroom candle was burning on the table. It was I who lit the lamp some minutes afterward."


"Did you see no one?"


"No. I heard Mrs. Douglas coming down the stair behind me, and I rushed out to prevent her from seeing this dreadful sight. Mrs. Allen, the housekeeper, came and took her away. Ames had arrived, and we ran back into the room once more."


"But surely I have heard that the drawbridge is kept up all night."


"Yes, it was up until I lowered it."


"Then how could any murderer have got away? It is out of the question! Mr. Douglas must have shot himself."


"That was our first idea. But see!"


Barker drew aside the curtain, and showed that the long, diamond-paned window was open to its full extent.


"And look at this!"


He held the lamp down and illuminated a smudge of blood like the mark of a boot-sole upon the wooden sill.


"Someone has stood there in getting out."


"You mean that someone waded across the moat?"


"Exactly!"


"Then if you were in the room within half a minute of the crime, he must have been in the water at that very moment."


"I have not a doubt of it. I wish to heaven that I had rushed to the window! But the curtain screened it, as you can see, and so it never occurred to me. Then I heard the step of Mrs. Douglas, and I could not let her enter the room. It would have been too horrible."


"Horrible enough!" said the doctor, looking at the shattered head and the terrible marks which surrounded it. "I've never seen such injuries since the Birlstone railway smash."


"But, I say," remarked the police sergeant, whose slow, bucolic common sense was still pondering the open window. "It's all very well your saying that a man escaped by wading this moat, but what I ask you is, how did he ever get into the house at all if the bridge was up?"


"Ah, that's the question," said Barker.


"At what o'clock was it raised?"


"It was nearly six o'clock," said Ames, the butler.


"I've heard," said the sergeant, "that it was usually raised at sunset. That would be nearer half-past four than six at this time of year."


"Mrs. Douglas had visitors to tea," said Ames. "I couldn't raise it until they went. Then I wound it up myself."


"Then it comes to this," said the sergeant: "If anyone came from outside--if they did--they must have got in across the bridge before six and been in hiding ever since, until Mr. Douglas came into the room after eleven."


"That is so! Mr. Douglas went round the house every night the last thing before he turned in to see that the lights were right. That brought him in here. The man was waiting and shot him. Then he got away through the window and left his gun behind him. That's how I read it; for nothing else will fit the facts."


The sergeant picked up a card which lay beside the dead man on the floor. The initials V. V. and under them the number 341 were rudely scrawled in ink upon it. "What's this?" he asked, holding it up. Barker looked at it with curiosity.


"I never noticed it before," he said. "The murderer must have left it behind him."


"V. V.--341. I can make no sense of that."


The sergeant kept turning it over in his big fingers.


"What's V. V.? Somebody's initials, maybe. What have you got there, Dr. Wood?" I


t was a good-sized hammer which had been lying on the rug in front of the fireplace--a substantial, workmanlike hammer. Cecil Barker pointed to a box of brass-headed nails upon the mantelpiece.


"Mr. Douglas was altering the pictures yesterday," he said. "I saw him myself, standing upon that chair and fixing the big picture above it. That accounts for the hammer."


"We'd best put it back on the rug where we found it," said the sergeant, scratching his puzzled head in his perplexity. "It will want the best brains in the force to get to the bottom of this thing. It will be a London job before it is finished."


He raised the hand lamp and walked slowly round the room.


"Hullo!" he cried, excitedly, drawing the window curtain to one side. "What o'clock were those curtains drawn?"


"When the lamps were lit," said the butler. "It would be shortly after four."


"Someone had been hiding here, sure enough."


He held down the light, and the marks of muddy boots were very visible in the corner. "I'm bound to say this bears out your theory, Mr. Barker. It looks as if the man got into the house after four when the curtains were drawn and before six when the bridge was raised. He slipped into this room, because it was the first that he saw. There was no other place where he could hide, so he popped in behind this curtain. That all seems clear enough. It is likely that his main idea was to burgle the house; but Mr. Douglas chanced to come upon him, so he murdered him and escaped." "That's how I read it," said Barker. "But, I say, aren't we wasting precious time? Couldn't we start out and scour the country before the fellow gets away?"


The sergeant considered for a moment. "There are no trains before six in the morning; so he can't get away by rail. If he goes by road with his legs all dripping, it's odds that someone will notice him. Anyhow, I can't leave here myself until I am relieved. But I think none of you should go until we see more clearly how we all stand."


The doctor had taken the lamp and was narrowly scrutinizing the body.


"What's this mark?" he asked. "Could this have any connection with the crime?"


The dead man's right arm was thrust out from his dressing gown, and exposed as high as the elbow. About halfway up the forearm was a curious brown design, a triangle inside a circle, standing out in vivid relief upon the lard-coloured skin.


"It's not tattooed," said the doctor, peering through his glasses. "I never saw anything like it. The man has been branded at some time as they brand cattle. What is the meaning of this?"


"I don't profess to know the meaning of it," said Cecil Barker; "but I have seen the mark on Douglas many times this last ten years."


"And so have I," said the butler. "Many a time when the master has rolled up his sleeves I have noticed that very mark. I've often wondered what it could be."


"Then it has nothing to do with the crime, anyhow," said the sergeant. "But it's a rum thing all the same. Everything about this case is rum. Well, what is it now?"


The butler had given an exclamation of astonishment and was pointing at the dead man's outstretched hand.


"They've taken his wedding ring!" he gasped.


"What!"


"Yes, indeed. Master always wore his plain gold wedding ring on the little finger of his left hand. That ring with the rough nugget on it was above it, and the twisted snake ring on the third finger. There's the nugget and there's the snake, but the wedding ring is gone."


"He's right," said Barker.


"Do you tell me," said the sergeant, "that the wedding ring was below the other?" "Always!"


"Then the murderer, or whoever it was, first took off this ring you call the nugget ring, then the wedding ring, and afterwards put the nugget ring back again."


"That is so!"


The worthy country policeman shook his head.


"Seems to me the sooner we get London on to this case the better," said he. "White Mason is a smart man. No local job has ever been too much for White Mason. It won't be long now before he is here to help us. But I expect we'll have to look to London before we are through. Anyhow, I'm not ashamed to say that it is a deal too thick for the likes of me."






About the book:


Holmes and faithful Dr. Watson are summoned to a country house by a coded message. They arrive too late to save a life, but pursue the trail to unmasking the murderer.


A classic Holmes story, also featuring the diabolical mastermind Professor Moriarty.


Buy on Amazon




More from The Valley of Fear:    Excerpt 1




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